SHOOT’s Top Spot of the Week: Bodega’s Mark Littman directs “Arpita Mandal” for Trickle Up

Arpita Mandal spends her days in distress about how to feed her children two meals a day and ensure that they are able to get an education of their own in her small village in India. Arpita and her family do not have any land to cultivate, living in just a 5’X7’ one single room home with a small veranda. Arpita shares her home with two children, her husband and mother-in-law. After Arpita’s husband was forced to leave the family to make a decent income, she discovered nonprofit Trickle Up and was able to earn her own income and join in a community of local women in similar circumstances.

Trickle Up focuses on the toughest challenges in global poverty alleviation: to reach the poorest, most vulnerable, isolated people and create trajectories towards financial independence.

Titled “Arpita Mandal,” this video directed by Mark Littman of BODEGA peers closer into Arpita’s journey with Trickle Up and how the empowerment of its services have not only boosted her financial situation, but also her outlook on the future and self worth.

BODEGA has lent its talent and expertise to media messaging for Trickle Up for more than a decade. Littman, BODEGA co-founder/partner, has journeyed to such places as India and Guatemala to tell the story of the nonprofit Trickle Up.

Credits

Client:  Trickle Up

Production:  Bodega   Mark Littman, director; Min Park, producer

Post-Production:  Northern Lights + SuperExploder   Chris Carson, editor; Chris Hengeveld, color; Brady Hearn, mixer/sound designer

6 Point Media is back with a new “As Told by Emoji”: Guardians of the Galaxy

The fantabulous animators at 6 Point Media have once again teamed up with Disney for the latest in the “As Told by Emoji” series. This time they take on Guardians of the Galaxy and bring you Star-Lord, Gamora, Drax, Rocket Raccoon and Groot like you’ve never seen them before: as out-of-this-world emoji.

Elliot Blanchard + Prism bring Future Portrait back to The Lab at NYC’s Panorama music festival

Director/designer/founder Elliot Blanchard at NYC’s PRISM is once again directing an interactive installation, Future Portrait, at HP’s “The Lab”, an experiential digital art show combining technology, artistry + design created exclusively by NYC artists at the Panorama music festival on Randall’s Island in late July.  Panorama is produced by Goldenvoice, the folks behind Coachella.

Future Portrait as Elliot describes, “Captures people’s motion through Kinects and transforms the movement into abstract animation. People can also remix the animation at touchscreens at the venue.”

Congratulations to the Bodega family for their 20 PromaxBDA nominations !

CD/Partner/Editor David Gioella proudly announced that the Bodega family of companies – Bodega, Northern Lights, Mr Wonderful + SuperExploder – has garnered a “personal best” 20 PromaxBDA nominations across a range of categories.

You can see all the nominations for this year’s awards here:

The winners will be announced at the PromaxBDA Conference June 8th in Los Angeles.  Good luck everybody !

 

Shine delivers main titles for HBO’s “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks”

Creative director Michael Riley + his team at SHINE designed, edited and produced the main title sequence for “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” which premiered this Sunday April 23 on HBO.

Oprah Winfrey and Rose Byrne star in this adaptation of Rebecca Skloot’s critically acclaimed, bestselling nonfiction book of the same name. Told through the eyes of Henrietta Lacks’ daughter, Deborah Lacks, the film chronicles her search, along with journalist Rebecca Skloot (Byrne), to learn about the mother she never knew and understand how the unauthorized harvesting of Lacks’ cancerous cells in 1951 led to unprecedented medical breakthroughs, changing countless lives and the face of medicine forever.

Co-written and directed by George C. Wolfe for HBO, the film follows Skloot (Rose Byrne) and Deborah Lacks (Winfrey) on a journey to understand more about Henrietta, who died of cervical cancer at age 31 in 1951, leaving behind five small children and a legacy that would change modern medicine.

Unbeknown to Henrietta (played in flashbacks by Renee Elise Goldsberry), a doctor at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore had removed cancer cells from her cervix. These cells were able to reproduce outside the body at astonishing rates, making them ideal for medical research.

The mass-produced HeLa cells, as they became known, have contributed to major breakthroughs, including the polio vaccine and in-vitro fertilization — all thanks to an African American woman who died in obscurity.

From the very beginning there was something uncanny about the cancer cells on Henrietta Lacks’s cervix. Even before killing Lacks herself in 1951, they took on a life of their own. Removed during a biopsy and cultured without her permission, the HeLa cells (named from the first two letters of her first and last names) reproduced boisterously in a lab at Johns Hopkins — the first human cells ever to do so.

HeLa became an instant biological celebrity, traveling to research labs all over the world. Meanwhile Lacks, a vivacious 31-year-old African-American who had once been a tobacco farmer, tended her five children and endured scarring radiation treatments in the hospital.After Henrietta Lacks’s death, HeLa went viral, so to speak, becoming the godmother of virology and then biotech, benefiting practically anyone who’s ever taken a pill stronger than aspirin.

Scientists have grown some 50 million metric tons of her cells, and you can get some for yourself simply by calling an 800 number. HeLa has helped build thousands of careers, not to mention more than 60,000 scientific studies, with nearly 10 more being published every day, revealing the secrets of everything from aging and cancer to mosquito mating and the cellular effects of the environment.

ReelChicago chats with SEED director Kristina Perreault

What’s up with SEED director Kristina Perrault ?

Chicago director Kristina Perreault is not afraid of things going wrong on the set, especially if they happen overseas.

“When traveling, sometimes stuff happens and you have to make it work,” she explains. “I like that challenge of constantly being on your toes.”

Besides being an accomplished travel documentarian, the latest addition to SEED’s roster also wields bona fide credentials as a show host and chef instructor. The experiences help her bring calm to non-actors dealing with on-camera jitters.

“I’m good at training people on location and getting them comfortable,” she explains. “A lot of time, it’s just their mental focus. We clear the room. We do breathing and we do voice exercises. Or I’ll just talk to them. I shift their focus to be more motivated and confident with the camera.”

Perreault says that her unique skillset began with an intense singular focus when she was in grade school.

Perreault (center) and crew in Dubai

Perreault (center) and crew in Dubai

“My parents were throwing away a video camera and I just started filming my friends and making films” she remembers. “I became obsessed with it.”

Although she grew up to become a world-savvy director, recently completed a project in Dubai and lists the Cyclades among her favorite locations, she says that SEED founder and executive producer Roy Skillicorn offers something that she has not found anywhere else.

“I feel that he genuinely has my back and my well being in my professional career,” she explains. “He’s a good guide. I’ve done business with other people. He goes that extra mile. That alone was kind of a big thing for me, to be able to have that kind of a relationship.”

Perreault also notes that she “gets along with Roy’s family well.” This hints at another driving force in her career. Born and raised in Minnesota, she chose to settle in Chicago partly because “it’s a little closer to home.”

So far, there’s at least one celebrity who’s happy she’s here.

“I was asked to come on to a set because a rapper was having a breakdown,” she explains. “Apparently he partied too hard the day before and didn’t want to be on camera.”