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TEN Quaker State

TEN Tricks Out a Lowrider for Quaker State

TEN Quaker State

Great new project from our friends at STUDIO TEN and parent company The Enthusiast Network (TEN) for Quaker State.

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Only a few seconds into the first episode of “Lowrider Roll Models,” we meet Steve Alvarez-Mott, an obstetrician and gynecologist who practices in Glendora and San Dimas, Calif. The camera slowly focuses in on Alvarez-Mott’s face as he explains how he got involved in the lowrider culture–a world where elaborately customized classic cars with hydraulics brings Latino families together. In the background bottles of Quaker State oil line the shelves.

It’s subtle product integration executed well by TEN: The Enthusiast Network. Nancy Bruner, Shell Lubricants manager of influencer strategy and engagement, was looking for an experience that would let advocates in the lowrider community see that Shell was equally passionate about helping their community thrive.

Shell Lubricant’s involvement began in 2015 as a way to gain traction and awareness in the U.S. Hispanic market, explained Rudy Rivas, GM, Lowrider Network. Mr. Rivas met with Don Moser, North America Marketing Manager at Shell Oil Company and Ms. Bruner many times, getting to know each other and developing friendships. It was a good match, said Mr. Rivas, because everyone involved shared an appreciation for not only the cars, but also the people and culture surrounding the lowrider lifestyle. Even though the LOWRIDER staff are “knucklebusters who have grease under their nails”, the human interest aspect of each episode offers broad appeal.

During those multiple meetings, the group brainstormed ways TEN could help Shell by creating custom video content that would make a difference in the lowrider community.TEN’s LOWRIDER magazine staffers had toyed with the idea of creating video for years, said Mr. Rivas, and having Shell Lubricant, featuring Quaker State Motor Oils, be a part of it made it all the more enthralling. “They wanted to integrate with a program that shows respect to the culture of the lowrider car enthusiast,” he said. “TEN has always been a first mover and helped brands grow new and existing audiences. We knew we could help the Quaker State brand activate and drive real engagement with the audience they wanted to reach.”

After bouncing a few ideas back and forth, Rivas and the team at Shell Lubricants decided to turn the magazine’s “Roll Model” column into a monthly video series, focusing on the four pillars of lowriding: performance, artistry, pride, and culture. The short video segments would profile male and female lowrider community leaders and their cars. It would also work to dispel outdated, negative myths about the lifestyle. (Television and movies have done a good job of making lowriding synonymous with organized crime and guns.) The fact that the people and cars featured in the lowrider series are true role models, working in their own communities for the betterment of all is an added benefit for Quaker State.

“In the case of ‘Roll Models,’ it wasn’t just, ‘We want to market to you [Hispanic community].’ It was really building out the idea of, ‘We have a shared passion around automotive and design. We all share this love.’ Now, we can help change the perception of a culture that has really well-respected folks designing, building and driving lowriders. For us, that’s incredibly appealing,” said Ms. Bruner.

That includes putting product in the hands of the lowrider car clubs and community to support their passion.”By supporting the lowrider community with product that they want and use, we help deliver a message that we all want to deliver – getting the stories told,” said Ms. Bruner.

To date, the videos–which launched in March 2016–have generated over 3.9 million views, and over 325,000 likes, comments, shares to date. There’s also cross-promotion via the one-page profile in the print magazine. While Ms. Bruner will not disclose all metrics, she said Shell Lubricants is “pleased with the program and our investment in underwriting has been well-placed.”

TEN Quaker State

One reason: Quaker State is seeing a great benefit from earned media. “We’ve seen a big increase in earned media awareness. There have been a lot of interview opportunities for us as well. From a reputation and brand perspective, the earned media is phenomenal and begins to build the credibility piece for us,” she explained. “It helps us to appeal to a broader number of people.”

TEN: The Enthusiast Network is the world’s premier transmedia network of enthusiast brands, such as MOTOR TREND, AUTOMOBILE, HOT ROD, SURFER, TRANSWORLD SKATEBOARDING, and GRINDTV. TEN’s audience represents the largest concentration of males age 18 to 34 within the automotive and action/outdoor categories.TEN helps brands connect with a powerful, active and influential group of passionate enthusiasts. Its massive scale across all platforms allows partners unmatched reach. For more information, visit enthusiastnetwork.com

 

MOE - Petersen

MindOverEye brings the Petersen Car Museum roaring back with walls of video

MOE - Petersen

The Scenic Route and the Petersen Automotive Museum approached MindOverEye to develop unique videos for the Museum’s re-opening in December of 2015. MindOverEye produced three distinct pieces of content utilizing design, CG/Animation, editorial, projection mapping, and live action for each of the Museum’s three floors centered around “Artistry of the Automobile,” “Thrill of Motorsports,” and “Road to Stardom.”

 

Here’s a nice story from: Wired

MOE - Petersen

The Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles turns 20 this year, and now the public can finally enjoy the fruits of the $125 million renovation it gave itself as a birthday present.

After a year of work, the Petersen, dedicated to collecting, preserving, and showing off historic vehicles, has reopened with an additional 300,000 square feet, 22 new galleries, and a crazy façade of candy red paint wrapped in steel ribbons. To fill all that space, the museum formed partnerships with a host of brands like Maserati, Ford, and Lucas Oil, giving it access to massive chunks of automotive history.

BMW, for example, will present a rotating selection of its famed Art Cars, which have been designed over the years by figures like Frank Stella, Roy Lichtenstein, Andy Warhol, Jeff Koons, and Jenny Holzer. Maserati will be the subject of a “Design To Production” exhibit where patrons can see the Italian fetish object go from the concept stage all the way to finished car. The Petersen will have the one and only show floor for the Ford GT Supercar, complete with a history of the machine dating back to 1966 when the GT won Le Mans.

All of this feels like standard, if impressive, museum fare. To bring this automotive shrine into the future, the brain trust at the Petersen knew it needed to make the new and improved space an immersive multi-media experience. So it hired creative agency MindOverEye to make custom video content for their massive new gallery halls.

MindOverEye has worked on campaigns for Lexus, Infinti, and Mercedes. Remember that cheeky “Villains” campaign for Jaguar? That was MindOverEye. The firm got an Emmy nomination for the visual effects work it did on the Neil Degrasse Tyson re-up of Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey.

For the Petersen project, it created a cohesive visual narrative that runs through the renovated museum’s three floors. The first floor is the “Artistry of the Automobile” section. On a 16-foot tall, 166-foot wide arced wall, you’ll see a 12-minute abstract video loop meant to invoke the “spark of inspiration” in automotive design.

Move up into the second level and you’ll be immersed in the “Thrill of Motorsports.” MindOverEye worked up another all-encompassing video exhibit for this floor that plays at a slightly more modest size, just seven feet high and 134-feet across. To ensure viewers feel fully enmeshed in a day in the life of an auto race, the wall wraps around 180 degrees and displays stock footage as well as live action video shot by the creative team. To capture the images for such a large-scale display—as in 23,000 pixels wide—MindOverEye deployed a custom nine-camera array with bespoke optics inside.

On the top floor comes the nod to Hollywood. The “Road To Stardom” exhibit commemorates the movie industry’s icon-creating history with automobiles.

The Petersen sits on LA’s Miracle Mile, a stretch that’s been blowing up in recent years. That includes a new metro stop coming soon (hey, car lovers can use public transit, too) and a bevy of trendy food spots popping up on local heat maps. That means it’s the perfect time to go get yourself a double fist of the art-filled bougie lifestyle: Snag a lunch of avocado toast and then get your culture on by crawling from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art to the Petersen.

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Richard de Aragues, will.i.am + Lexus create epic driving spectacular on a laser street

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Played out on a disused runway lined with more than 350 projected mapped motion and audio sensitive lasers and lights, Original Film director Richard de Aragues, musical artist will.i.am and stunt driver Niki Faulkner battle against speed and rhythm to conduct and navigate a trio of Lexus NXs’, hitting the laser ‘targets’ at the correct tempo to synchronise with music.

A team of sixty-five technicians worked for over seven days to build the rigging for the lights and motion sensitive lasers, designed by Marshmallow Laser Feast (MLF), instead of using CGI only.

Speaking about the video, will.i.am said: ”Working with the stunt guys to hit the laser targets in time with the music wasn’t easy to get right but the result was awesome. The combination of technology, design and music in this project was out of this world.”

MLF Creative Director, Barnaby Steel said: “Together with Lexus, we’ve created a huge musical game with three stunt drivers as the players and will.i.am as the conductor. Music is brought to life when the cars hit beams of light that are motion sensitive at the correct time and rhythm. It’s basically like a giant laser harp with cars instead of fingers. The challenge for will.i.am and the drivers was to navigate the light points on tempo. When they fell off beat and triggered notes off tempo, the system would have to restart.”

Here’s a look behind the scenes to see how it was done

YouTube film here – http://j.mp/1NFps7i – (last we checked 1.6M views!)

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You Got BIG? You Got ACTION? You Got CELEBS? We got ROB COHEN at Original

Super excited to welcome Rob Cohen to esteemed client ORIGINAL.

 

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Rob Cohen IMDb

When you have something Big, Action-ey, Celebs, etc., we expect to hear from you.

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MindOverEye profiled in SourceEcreative Rastermasters Special Feature

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From its home base in automotive work, the fast-growing company is expanding boldly into new product, content and media categories.

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The Mars Rover doesn’t have a lot in common with the Jaguar F-Type or the latest pulse-throbbing iteration of Chevy’s Corvette Stingray Coupe. The Rover, for example, has six wheels, and runs on what’s probably a little nuclear reactor. It also can’t go from zero to sixty in under five seconds. But don’t tell that to the folks at MindOverEye. For them, if it moves, reflects light, has curves and can shine, then they’ve got it covered.

Of course, that description fits a lot of things besides Martian land craft and muscle cars. Just about any consumer electronic gadget would fit nicely, as would any manner of recreational gizmo that has a modern, high-tech and ultra-sleek look to it. Frankly, it really doesn’t matter what your hero product might be. When it comes to finding new ways to make it look simply awesome, MindOverEye and its cadre of artists, programmers, producers and directors are up to the task.

They’ve done it for the aforementioned Rover (as part of their work for TV’s “Cosmos” series, an image from which appears above), as well as for just about every automotive model you’ve ever lusted after while sitting at a stop light. But they’ve handled more than just sheet metal, shooting VFX-infused, integrated live action work for a range of brands.

When last we checked in with MindOverEye back in the fall of 2013 (you can see that story here), the studio was riding high on a number of interesting projects for brands such as Jaguar and Microsoft. In the case of the former, the studio was asked to shoot a few effects-oriented inserts. In the process of capturing live action footage for the assignment, they shot added content and transformed it, on their own, into a fast-paced, design-driven standalone commercial. They showed it to the client and its agency, Spark 44, and it was met with open arms (not to mention the smell of burning rubber). The spot has gone on to run around the world, with the client recently re-upping to use it for a second year.

Since then, MOE Founder and ECD Bill Wadsworth says the studio has simply exploded. They’ve experienced growth in the area of 60 percent since moving into their current complex in El Segundo back in December of 2012, where they operate out of a 15,000 square-foot nest of shooting stages, edit rooms and workstations.

MindOverEye is still an integral part of parent company Source Interlink, publishers of iconic titles like Motor Trend. Earlier this year Source Interlink rebranded its media division as The Enthusiast Network (TEN), home to a range of online video content sites that cater to everyone from car buffs to the burgeoning action/sports market.

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From the initial success of its Jaguar spot, MOE has been commissioned to produce a half-dozen more long-form pieces, including a series that puts the F-Type through moves and settings straight out of an action thriller.

Wadsworth and MOE’s Director of Integrated Production Paul Babb – who first worked together at Ogilvy & Mather in Los Angeles, along with MOE Executive Producer Dave Wein, back in the 1990s – report that the studio has worked for close to a dozen major automotive brands in the past two years, including Ford, Lincoln, Hyundai, Dodge and others.

The company was tapped by Infiniti to produce a dark and foreboding short film titled “The Beast Within,” to introduce its sexy Q50 Eau Rouge concept car (which was created completely in CG), and created an experiential event for the model that was mounted at this year’s Concours d’Elegance in Pebble Beach, California, the preeminent luxury car show in the US.

And they were brought in by the VFX supervisor on the aforementioned Fox/National Geographic series “Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey” to produce a number of shots for this critically-acclaimed series. What started as a small assignment quickly ballooned to over 150 effects shots, says Babb, with a number of them being part of the work that earned “Cosmos” an Emmy nomination for Outstanding Visual Effects.

Much of MindOverEye’s automotive work, Wadsworth says, arises out of the studio’s connection with TEN, whose automotive channel on YouTube has over 2.6 million subscribers. In fact, MOE produced a live installment of TEN’s popular YouTube show “Wide Open Throttle” during the Pebble Beach show. If anything, these kinds of projects represent the future of where MOE is headed. Wadsworth and Babb report that the company’s volume of live action production has taken off in the past year. “We’ve shot in 15 different countries, creating over 100 hours of original content working with just about every kind of image capture device out there,” says Wadsworth.

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This explosion of work is being fed into a slew of media projects MOE has undertaken, and the list is dizzying. They’re creating commercials, branded content, original programming, apps and games and for some of the top users of design and effects-laden imagery out there.

Get Wadsworth talking about these gigs and it’s hard to get him to stop. [/column]

He’ll tell you, for example, about the work they’ve done with Dodge, drifting a rare Viper sports car across the desert flats near Barstow or racing it through the closed-off streets of downtown Detroit. (And if you’re up for it, check out MOE’s Dodge “Revolution” driving app, which you can download off the iTunes store.)

And then there’s the Augmented Reality work they’re doing for both racing games and other digital entertainment genres. Again, if you get Wadsworth rolling on this I advise you to start taking notes. He’ll explain mobile shading algorithms, physics-based user interfaces, extended tracking systems and lot of other technical jargon, but keep in mind that all these terms usually add up to one thing: awesomeness.

“It’s kind of like the nerds have been left to their own devices, and they’ve simultaneously generated all this cool stuff,” he says with a laugh about his studio’s diverse output. And it’s easy to share his enthusiasm.

So what’s driving all of this work, we asked? “It’s because we have the talent and we’ve shown we can do really outstanding stuff,” says Babb. “On top of that, we deliver what we say we’re going to deliver.” More importantly for ad agencies is their ability to take macro views of a brand’s content needs and figure out smart ways to satisfy them, says Wadsworth. MindOverEye has been investing heavily in building up its storage and render capability, bulking up its pipeline and adding to its fiber backbone, all geared to handle the multi-genre, multi-platform, multi-media needs of advertisers. “When you need to get as much of your production budgets as you can, then it’s all about harvesting data,” Wadsworth says. “It’s important to capture as much as you can going in, and it’s how we’ve always worked.”

This methodology has particular value for automotive brands, he points out, given their voracious needs, “but our process can benefit almost anyone,” he points out. “And we’ve been on a tear getting people to see what they can get out of their production budgets for just a little added effort or money, and how much value that adds. It really drives the cost of everything down when you look at the economy of scale.

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The work the studio did on “Cosmos” has opened doors for them outside the automotive category, says Babb, which the studio has welcomed as a balance for its automotive work. One area they feel particularly well-suited for is the growing action/sports genre, an important category for The Enthusiast Network. MOE is positioning itself to work on brand integration content for advertisers that are interested in connecting with this audience, which skews younger and more upscale, and they’ve already produced online videos for both Ford and Subaru tied to activities like surfing and kite sailing.

Lots of things are on the horizon for the studio, Wadsworth adds. They’re actively negotiating for more space in their current campus, where the 80-or so people who work there every day are busting at the seams. This, of course, will give them an opportunity to retrofit their existing studio space and build out new space, which is something of a specialty for Wadsworth. MindOverEye has been his baby since he began to devote himself to it full time after leaving his position running the graphics and design studio at O&M in 2004. (Up until then it had been his agency-sanctioned sideline, a place for him to experiment with new graphics and effects technologies, many of which he brought back to Ogilvy.)

“We have such a good, solid, strong company now, and it’s so different than the one that moved into this space almost two years ago,” he says with pride. “There’s an eclectic array of things going on here every day, and we’ve taken our strengths and stretched them really wide. We have an actively curious community of people here, and one of their favorite things to do is share, so there’s a lot of cross-pollination,” not just among the MOE staff but between them and other elements of the TEN media team.

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It’s all paying off big-time for Wadsworth, Babb, Wein and other senior members of the MOE management team. That they’re having this much fun at this stage of their careers isn’t lost on them, either. “We’ve got great support from our corporate parent, and lots of latitude to pursue some unorthodox things for a visual effects and CG studio, but we feel it’s reaping huge dividends for us,” Wadsworth says.

For now, they feel as though they’re sitting on a goldmine. They’re being tasked with new challenges, broadening their client base and producing more original programming – all part of their long terms plans. More immediately, the joint promises to stay super busy: “Over the short term I can see us doubling in size,” Wadsworth sums up. “We’re out to build a one-of-a-kind facility here, one that will function as a unique content engine. We can’t wait to turn it loose.”

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Integrated one-stop shop MindOverEye smokes it up for Jaguar

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