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Director Tim Abshire reunites with Roy Skillicorn at SEED

 

Award winning humor, celebrity and storytelling director, Tim Abshire has teamed up with long-time friend, former EP, marketing trendsetter, and owner of SEED, Roy Skillicorn.

Roy Skillicorn is elated that Tim Abshire has come aboard. “Tim’s ability to generate stories that give rise to everything from a smile to riotous laugh-out-loud humor, combined with his jovial, collaborative disposition, and his commitment to excellence is exactly what I was seeking for SEED. What’s more, his work now expands us into the humor genre, which has always been an integral part of my personal brand, ” says Skillicorn.

Tim adds “The first time I met Roy I was blown away. Roy’s superpower is the ability to effortlessly light up a room, but his real talent is sharing that light and making everyone else shine.”

Roy and Tim developed a strong personal bond while working together at Backyard Productions, a company Skillicorn founded. It was there that they developed a successful business relationship that proved highly prosperous and congenial.

Tim is known as the quintessential actors’ director. The innocence and honesty he captures from an actor’s performance, combined with his exquisite timing, allows the resulting humor to be globally relatable, yet specifically fine-tuned and tailored to the client’s demographic needs.

“His strength as a writer enables him to fully articulate his vision in treatments, maintaining an instinctive understanding of the essential goals of a project” adds Seed’s Head of Sales, Jessica Rae Connell. “He’s quick and decisive on set, providing an environment, rich in spontaneity and passion. His timing often relies on hanging on to an engaging awkward pause in the action to catch the viewing audience off guard fostering a hilarious response.”

Traveling the world to hone his craft, Tim has created and directed content for numerous blue chip brands, including Google, Jeep, ESPN, Walmart, PlayStation, Febreze, Volkswagen, Coca Cola and jetBlue, with top agencies domestically and internationally, such as Grey Worldwide, Wieden & Kennedy, Ogilvy & Mather, David&Goliath, and Leo Burnett.

Tim has worked with celebrities as diverse as Drew Barrymore, Chris Rock, Derek Jeter, Ben Stiller, Jeff Goldblum, Dale Earnhardt Jr., Alice Cooper, Triple H and Sheryl Crow. Tim is a highly decorated director with over 30 top industry awards, including 3 Gold Lions, an MTV Moonman Award, Gold Pencils, and numerous Gold winners from Promax, and the Clios.

Alpert + O’Neill Between “The Rock” and a Hard Place on HBO

Working with longtime collaborators HBO and producing in tandem with film star Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, director/producers Jon Alpert + Matt O’Neill debut their new documentary ROCK & A HARD PLACE  Monday March 27th at 10pm.

Jon + Matt are available for spot + branded content work at NYC’s Rascal Films.

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Incarcerated young people enter the famed Miami-Dade County Corrections & Rehabilitation Boot Camp Program in search of a second chance: the opportunity to trade an extensive prison sentence for a fresh start. In this harsh, 16-week camp, drill instructors push inmates to their limit, but those who complete it can become constructive members of society who are substantially less likely to return to prison. The program reports a recidivism rate under 15%, while the national rate of prison recidivism is approximately 70%.

Inspired by Dwayne Johnson’s own experiences with the law as a youth, ROCK AND A HARD PLACE is a passion project for Dwayne Johnson, who calls it one of the most important films he’s been associated with. “By the time I was 16, I had been arrested multiple times for a variety of things, and can relate to what these kids are going through,” he says.

Johnson executive produces along with Dany Garcia, his producing partner and co-founder of Seven Bucks Productions, and Rasha Drachkovitch of 44 Blue Productions, the Emmy®-nominated executive producer behind “Lockup,” the longest-running prison series. Oscar® nominees and multiple Emmy® winners Matthew O’Neill and Jon Alpert produce and direct.

The film opens with Johnson’s visit to the boot camp, where he observes the induction of a group of 38 young offenders, convicted of crimes ranging from assault to armed robbery, who are on the brink of lengthy prison terms. Once the chaos has subsided, he tells the young men why he wants the world to see this program and emphasizes why he believes this may be their last chance.

ROCK AND A HARD PLACE follows the inmates through each phase of the camp, beginning with the brutal first weeks, which are marked by constant verbal confrontation, physical training and strict military-style discipline. Several cadets can’t or won’t comply with the rules, and the ranks are thinned to 35 after a month. Those who remain resolve to follow their instructor’s extreme demands, although tears and moments of resistance sometimes surface.

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As the weeks go by, cadets attend anger-management classes, learn vocational skills and are surprised by “protocol tests” that measure their progress and patience. In what guards call “a test of discipline,” some of the more promising men are selected to leave the prison as part of a mobile work crew. Two of them decide to escape during one such session, but are soon recaptured after a manhunt that makes the evening news, and now face even longer prison sentences. The incident rattles camp guards and management, who warn the other prisoners that escape attempts will only undermine the legitimacy of the entire program.

Cadets finally arrive at graduation day, where family members beam as they march past in precise formations before being released to their loved ones. Johnson gives emotional remarks as he congratulates the young men at a post-graduation courtroom reception.

Jon Alpert and Matthew O’Neill note, “As our nation wrestles with a prison system that has become the largest in the world, ROCK AND A HARD PLACE highlights an alternative incarceration program that provides a pathway to hope and positive change.”

Shine designs LA LA LAND logos + titles for Lions Gate + Damien Chazelle

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Shine designed the main titles & designed and animated vintage studio film logos as well as other typography and graphics for the new Lions Gate film LA LA LAND from director Damien Chazelle.

LA LA LAND Producer Fred Berger said, “I’ve had the privilege of working with Shine on three films already and will keep roping them into projects as long as they’ll continue to put up with me. Michael, Bob, and their team are, quite simply, exceptional. They are visionary artists, consummate professionals, passionate storytellers, and an utter joy to work with.

Our most recent collaboration, Damien Chazelle’s LA LA LAND, demanded a delicate balance of old and new while making a bold statement off the bat. Shine created a beautiful Summit logo, imagining what it might have looked like in the 40’s or 50’s, which immediately sets the tone and pulls us into the world of the film. But nothing makes me smile more than when audiences applaud as the striking golden main title card slams onto picture and fills the frame. They’re cheering for the opening musical number, but also for Shine’s brilliant work. And it’s well deserved.”

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LA LA LAND is the story of Mia, an aspiring actress, and Sebastian, a dedicated jazz musician, struggling to make ends meet while pursuing their dreams in a city known for destroying hopes and breaking hearts. With modern day Los Angeles as the backdrop, this musical about everyday life explores what is more important: a once-in-a-lifetime love or the spotlight.

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Fantastic fashion + celeb portrait photography from Matthew Peyton

Check it out! Sensational fashion + celebrity portrait photography work from our friend MATTHEW PEYTON

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Nothing can prepare you for – “THE CHICKENING” !

Update: 1M views on YouTube

The Chickening

World-premiered at the Toronto Film Festival, US-premiered at Sundance this past Sunday night and Schaffer/Rogers premiering RIGHT HERE!  Fantastically sick short film from filmmakers Davy Force + Nick DenBoer.  We proudly represent Davy Force for spots + branded content at 6 POINT MEDIA

You haven’t seen “The Shining” until you’ve seen it infused with chickens!

The Chickening is the first of its kind in remixed, augmented cinema. It is a theatrical trailer for a fictional film in which Stanley Kubrick’s classic film The Shining has been artfully transformed into a new, poultry infused comedy adventure by digitally altering the film to create a new narrative. This new style of filmmaking is a hilarious collision of classic films with modern day visual effects; “Cinegraffiti” — the ultimate neonostalgic visual feast for this digital age.

The Chickening

Fun review + interview from film blogger Scott Wampler below:

The Chickening

NOTHING CAN PREPARE YOU FOR “THE CHICKENING”
Directors Nick DenBoer and Davy Force have created something you simply have to see to believe.
By Scott Wampler Jan. 26, 2016

I have attended Fantastic Fest for many years now, and lemme tell ya: during that time, I have seen a thing or two. I’ve seen courageous feats of karaoke. I’ve had unexpected run-ins with weirdo celebrities. I’ve seen food fights, I’ve seen actual fights, and I’ve had my face melted right the fuck off by the world’s greatest Satanic marching band.

I’ve also had my mind blown by more movies than I could possibly count (if there’s one thing Fantastic Fest does better than anything else, it’s that), and at Fantastic Fest 2015, the most mindblowing bit of filmmaking I encountered was a short film by the name of The Chickening.

At Fantastic Fest, this short (directed by Toronto-based filmmakers Nick DenBoer and Davy Force) was paired with Anders Thomas Jensen’s Men & Chicken, and…well, to say “it took everyone by surprise” would be a massive understatement. The crowd I saw this short with went bananas. We talked about it for months afterwards, hoping that it’d eventually make its way online, where it might be shared with the rest of the world. Today’s a big day for some of us.

It’s an especially big day for The Chickening’s creative team. I was fortunate enough to speak with Nick DenBoer over the weekend, and he agreed to answer a few of my stupid questions about his incredible short:

First question: why?

Why chicken? I grew up on a chicken farm and then worked in my dad’s poultry butcher shop until I was 17, de-boning and slingin’ chicken carcasses. You can’t shake that shit.

My co-director Davy Force and I have been talking about doing this mega, next-level film remix for years and we finally had some free time last March to bust it out. We’re both animators/vfx artists/remixers and we have collaborated on a lot of similar projects, so this came together pretty naturally. The Chickening is a proof of concept we made to pitch around to studios, namely Warner Bros (hence The Shining) in a bid to create a series where every episode is a different remixed classic film. It’s a lot of fun to do and we think it’s got a lot of viral potential, but obviously there’s a lot of red tape in acquiring and regurgitating Hollywood’s sacred cows.

How long did it take you to put this together?

Davy flew up to my studio in Toronto and we shot the shit for about a week, writing and rough editing to force our new narrative on the original film. We then parted ways and cranked on it for about 2 1/2 months; Davy from his studio in LA and me in Toronto. We collaborated remotely and I assembled it as it came together. This was intended to be a 22-minute piece, but we did this for zero budget in our spare time, so we did as much as we could until it worked as a balls-out trailer. If we made our 22-minute version as intended, the narrative would make a lot more sense, but I think it’s going to live as you see it and we are moving on to the next project.

Wait, is that Kenny Hotz of Kenny VS Spenny fame? Holy shit.

Yes, that’s K-Ho. We’ve been pals for a long time. I worked on Kenny Vs. Spenny and we’ve done a lot of messed up video stuff together.  He’s always down for taking his pants off in front of the camera. Kenny’s been a huge help in selling the idea and getting The Chickening into the film festival circuit. He’s onboard to help write and produce more of this kind of stuff wherever The Chickening takes us.

Is there anything special you’d like to note about the short? Anything we might’ve missed the first time through, or any special behind-the-scenes goings-on that were particularly compelling?

There’s lots you probably missed the first time through. Maybe the pictures of ISIS on the wall behind Jack in the office, or the box of chicken-flavored condoms, or the pile of Tommy Wiseau references. This thing is loaded with Easter eggs and designed to be watched a bunch of times, so you’ll keep seeing new details. Kubrick was like that with all the details, too, and we think – although we sort of defaced his film – that we are still paying homage to a great piece of cinema. We wanted every still of this thing to have a WTF vibe.

Behind the scenes shooting was fun. I took a whole chicken and cut off its head and feet to use as a puppet in the final shot where Wendy is getting attacked. Pretty much everything was shot on green screen and comped. It was all done pretty DIY on no budget, so all the voice actors were pals, so it was a blast shooting the mouth replacements. And the shot of the girls dancing is actually me dancing: I mapped the dresses onto my body and then built the hallway in 3D and projection-mapped a still onto it so I could do some fancy virtual camera work. That’s my favorite shot, I think.  I made the music for that too.

We’ve seen stuff along these lines before – clips from famous films reborn with added effects, bits of one title edited into another – but DenBoer and Force are playing a different game here. DenBoer says the original intention was for The Chickening to be 22 minutes long, a claim backed up by the insane plot synopsis included in the press release I received:

Jack Torrance takes a new job as senior chief night manager for “Charbay’s Chicken World” —a state­-of­-the-­art, volcano­-fried, fast-food poultry production facility and resort strategically built on an active volcano. Jack travels to the remote facility with his wife, Wendy, and 42­-year-­old man­-child son, Danny.

During orientation, Mansturd Nurlman (regional manager of Charbay’s) mentions a new experimental product that is currently under development: “The Shiny” — a brand new BBQ sauce created in the research laboratory deep within the radioactive volcano. Strange things start happening to Jack after he tries the sauce, and he slowly begins morphing into a chicken creature and becomes unstable and aggressive.

Scatmok (a hyper­dimensional alien) conspires with Danny and his little friend Tony (a snarky Italian man who happens to be Danny’s index finger) to steal the recipe for “The Shiny” but their plan is compromised when they realize the horrific side effects of the experimental BBQ sauce. Danny and Scatmok decide they must destroy the BBQ sauce pipeline in order to stop the spread of this condition that has mutated Danny’s father.

Meanwhile, Jack has learned some of the restaurant’s darkest secrets from some of the other employees, including a potential cure for his condition. In the end, the restaurant is destroyed in a spectacular exploding BBQ sauce conflagration, with Wendy, Danny, Tony, Scatmok and a now­-cured but frozen­-solid Jack, who grumpily curses his former employers as they drive off in the Beak-Machine into the sunset.

FFake and John McAfee making anti-virus viral madness with girls, guns, and blow!

We heard yesterday about this crazy John McAfee Video blowing up on the Interwebs.

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Little did we know esteemed client ffake right in the middle of it!