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Shine PRU

Shine Tells the 144-Year Story of Prudential

PRU 1A

LA’s Shine collaborated with the creative team at Prudential to tell the story of the company’s 144 year heritage of working with people to strengthen communities around the world. Prudential is a financial giant with a workforce of over 40,000 worldwide. With its early roots in providing insurance and financial independence for the working man, they have been a financial force for making the world a better place for all.

Prudential

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The Shine team collaborated with Prudential Advertising on a five-day shoot in and around the studio on Miracle Mile in Los Angeles. Shine’s historic 1927 Art Deco building was a versatile location for both interiors and exteriors. The agency, the design team and the talent proved to be a great recipe for collaboration over the three separate shoot session. Shooting happened downstairs while editorial and animation fluidly took place simultaneously upstairs in the editorial suite.

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MOE - Petersen

MindOverEye brings the Petersen Car Museum roaring back with walls of video

MOE - Petersen

The Scenic Route and the Petersen Automotive Museum approached MindOverEye to develop unique videos for the Museum’s re-opening in December of 2015. MindOverEye produced three distinct pieces of content utilizing design, CG/Animation, editorial, projection mapping, and live action for each of the Museum’s three floors centered around “Artistry of the Automobile,” “Thrill of Motorsports,” and “Road to Stardom.”

 

Here’s a nice story from: Wired

MOE - Petersen

The Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles turns 20 this year, and now the public can finally enjoy the fruits of the $125 million renovation it gave itself as a birthday present.

After a year of work, the Petersen, dedicated to collecting, preserving, and showing off historic vehicles, has reopened with an additional 300,000 square feet, 22 new galleries, and a crazy façade of candy red paint wrapped in steel ribbons. To fill all that space, the museum formed partnerships with a host of brands like Maserati, Ford, and Lucas Oil, giving it access to massive chunks of automotive history.

BMW, for example, will present a rotating selection of its famed Art Cars, which have been designed over the years by figures like Frank Stella, Roy Lichtenstein, Andy Warhol, Jeff Koons, and Jenny Holzer. Maserati will be the subject of a “Design To Production” exhibit where patrons can see the Italian fetish object go from the concept stage all the way to finished car. The Petersen will have the one and only show floor for the Ford GT Supercar, complete with a history of the machine dating back to 1966 when the GT won Le Mans.

All of this feels like standard, if impressive, museum fare. To bring this automotive shrine into the future, the brain trust at the Petersen knew it needed to make the new and improved space an immersive multi-media experience. So it hired creative agency MindOverEye to make custom video content for their massive new gallery halls.

MindOverEye has worked on campaigns for Lexus, Infinti, and Mercedes. Remember that cheeky “Villains” campaign for Jaguar? That was MindOverEye. The firm got an Emmy nomination for the visual effects work it did on the Neil Degrasse Tyson re-up of Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey.

For the Petersen project, it created a cohesive visual narrative that runs through the renovated museum’s three floors. The first floor is the “Artistry of the Automobile” section. On a 16-foot tall, 166-foot wide arced wall, you’ll see a 12-minute abstract video loop meant to invoke the “spark of inspiration” in automotive design.

Move up into the second level and you’ll be immersed in the “Thrill of Motorsports.” MindOverEye worked up another all-encompassing video exhibit for this floor that plays at a slightly more modest size, just seven feet high and 134-feet across. To ensure viewers feel fully enmeshed in a day in the life of an auto race, the wall wraps around 180 degrees and displays stock footage as well as live action video shot by the creative team. To capture the images for such a large-scale display—as in 23,000 pixels wide—MindOverEye deployed a custom nine-camera array with bespoke optics inside.

On the top floor comes the nod to Hollywood. The “Road To Stardom” exhibit commemorates the movie industry’s icon-creating history with automobiles.

The Petersen sits on LA’s Miracle Mile, a stretch that’s been blowing up in recent years. That includes a new metro stop coming soon (hey, car lovers can use public transit, too) and a bevy of trendy food spots popping up on local heat maps. That means it’s the perfect time to go get yourself a double fist of the art-filled bougie lifestyle: Snag a lunch of avocado toast and then get your culture on by crawling from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art to the Petersen.

Bodega Xifaxan

Bodega/Northern Lights played in the Big Game with Xifaxan

Bodega Xifaxan

Big Game congrats to our folks at NYC one-stop shop BODEGA on their 3rd quarter Superbowl spot for Xifaxan! The interwebs are aflame and the Twitter-verse is atwitter… Bodega handled the live action with Northern Lights’ Glenn Conte cutting + Chris Hengeveld coloring and SuperExploder’s Jody Nazzaro mixing.

 

P.S., The ad worked

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The Chickening

NOTHING CAN PREPARE YOU FOR – “THE CHICKENING” !

Update: 1M views on YouTube

The Chickening

World-premiered at the Toronto Film Festival, US-premiered at Sundance this past Sunday night and Schaffer/Rogers premiering RIGHT HERE!  Fantastically sick short film from filmmakers Davy Force + Nick DenBoer.  We proudly represent Davy Force for spots + branded content at 6 POINT MEDIA

You haven’t seen “The Shining” until you’ve seen it infused with chickens!

The Chickening is the first of its kind in remixed, augmented cinema. It is a theatrical trailer for a fictional film in which Stanley Kubrick’s classic film The Shining has been artfully transformed into a new, poultry infused comedy adventure by digitally altering the film to create a new narrative. This new style of filmmaking is a hilarious collision of classic films with modern day visual effects; “Cinegraffiti” — the ultimate neonostalgic visual feast for this digital age.

The Chickening

Fun review + interview from film blogger Scott Wampler below:

The Chickening

NOTHING CAN PREPARE YOU FOR “THE CHICKENING”
Directors Nick DenBoer and Davy Force have created something you simply have to see to believe.
By Scott Wampler Jan. 26, 2016

I have attended Fantastic Fest for many years now, and lemme tell ya: during that time, I have seen a thing or two. I’ve seen courageous feats of karaoke. I’ve had unexpected run-ins with weirdo celebrities. I’ve seen food fights, I’ve seen actual fights, and I’ve had my face melted right the fuck off by the world’s greatest Satanic marching band.

I’ve also had my mind blown by more movies than I could possibly count (if there’s one thing Fantastic Fest does better than anything else, it’s that), and at Fantastic Fest 2015, the most mindblowing bit of filmmaking I encountered was a short film by the name of The Chickening.

At Fantastic Fest, this short (directed by Toronto-based filmmakers Nick DenBoer and Davy Force) was paired with Anders Thomas Jensen’s Men & Chicken, and…well, to say “it took everyone by surprise” would be a massive understatement. The crowd I saw this short with went bananas. We talked about it for months afterwards, hoping that it’d eventually make its way online, where it might be shared with the rest of the world. Today’s a big day for some of us.

It’s an especially big day for The Chickening’s creative team. I was fortunate enough to speak with Nick DenBoer over the weekend, and he agreed to answer a few of my stupid questions about his incredible short:

First question: why?

Why chicken? I grew up on a chicken farm and then worked in my dad’s poultry butcher shop until I was 17, de-boning and slingin’ chicken carcasses. You can’t shake that shit.

My co-director Davy Force and I have been talking about doing this mega, next-level film remix for years and we finally had some free time last March to bust it out. We’re both animators/vfx artists/remixers and we have collaborated on a lot of similar projects, so this came together pretty naturally. The Chickening is a proof of concept we made to pitch around to studios, namely Warner Bros (hence The Shining) in a bid to create a series where every episode is a different remixed classic film. It’s a lot of fun to do and we think it’s got a lot of viral potential, but obviously there’s a lot of red tape in acquiring and regurgitating Hollywood’s sacred cows.

How long did it take you to put this together?

Davy flew up to my studio in Toronto and we shot the shit for about a week, writing and rough editing to force our new narrative on the original film. We then parted ways and cranked on it for about 2 1/2 months; Davy from his studio in LA and me in Toronto. We collaborated remotely and I assembled it as it came together. This was intended to be a 22-minute piece, but we did this for zero budget in our spare time, so we did as much as we could until it worked as a balls-out trailer. If we made our 22-minute version as intended, the narrative would make a lot more sense, but I think it’s going to live as you see it and we are moving on to the next project.

Wait, is that Kenny Hotz of Kenny VS Spenny fame? Holy shit.

Yes, that’s K-Ho. We’ve been pals for a long time. I worked on Kenny Vs. Spenny and we’ve done a lot of messed up video stuff together.  He’s always down for taking his pants off in front of the camera. Kenny’s been a huge help in selling the idea and getting The Chickening into the film festival circuit. He’s onboard to help write and produce more of this kind of stuff wherever The Chickening takes us.

Is there anything special you’d like to note about the short? Anything we might’ve missed the first time through, or any special behind-the-scenes goings-on that were particularly compelling?

There’s lots you probably missed the first time through. Maybe the pictures of ISIS on the wall behind Jack in the office, or the box of chicken-flavored condoms, or the pile of Tommy Wiseau references. This thing is loaded with Easter eggs and designed to be watched a bunch of times, so you’ll keep seeing new details. Kubrick was like that with all the details, too, and we think – although we sort of defaced his film – that we are still paying homage to a great piece of cinema. We wanted every still of this thing to have a WTF vibe.

Behind the scenes shooting was fun. I took a whole chicken and cut off its head and feet to use as a puppet in the final shot where Wendy is getting attacked. Pretty much everything was shot on green screen and comped. It was all done pretty DIY on no budget, so all the voice actors were pals, so it was a blast shooting the mouth replacements. And the shot of the girls dancing is actually me dancing: I mapped the dresses onto my body and then built the hallway in 3D and projection-mapped a still onto it so I could do some fancy virtual camera work. That’s my favorite shot, I think.  I made the music for that too.

We’ve seen stuff along these lines before – clips from famous films reborn with added effects, bits of one title edited into another – but DenBoer and Force are playing a different game here. DenBoer says the original intention was for The Chickening to be 22 minutes long, a claim backed up by the insane plot synopsis included in the press release I received:

Jack Torrance takes a new job as senior chief night manager for “Charbay’s Chicken World” —a state­-of­-the-­art, volcano­-fried, fast-food poultry production facility and resort strategically built on an active volcano. Jack travels to the remote facility with his wife, Wendy, and 42­-year-­old man­-child son, Danny.

During orientation, Mansturd Nurlman (regional manager of Charbay’s) mentions a new experimental product that is currently under development: “The Shiny” — a brand new BBQ sauce created in the research laboratory deep within the radioactive volcano. Strange things start happening to Jack after he tries the sauce, and he slowly begins morphing into a chicken creature and becomes unstable and aggressive.

Scatmok (a hyper­dimensional alien) conspires with Danny and his little friend Tony (a snarky Italian man who happens to be Danny’s index finger) to steal the recipe for “The Shiny” but their plan is compromised when they realize the horrific side effects of the experimental BBQ sauce. Danny and Scatmok decide they must destroy the BBQ sauce pipeline in order to stop the spread of this condition that has mutated Danny’s father.

Meanwhile, Jack has learned some of the restaurant’s darkest secrets from some of the other employees, including a potential cure for his condition. In the end, the restaurant is destroyed in a spectacular exploding BBQ sauce conflagration, with Wendy, Danny, Tony, Scatmok and a now­-cured but frozen­-solid Jack, who grumpily curses his former employers as they drive off in the Beak-Machine into the sunset.

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You Got BIG? You Got ACTION? You Got CELEBS? We got ROB COHEN at Original

Super excited to welcome Rob Cohen to esteemed client ORIGINAL.

 

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Rob Cohen IMDb

When you have something Big, Action-ey, Celebs, etc., we expect to hear from you.

Super Bowl open

BODEGA Got the Party Started to Open Super Bowl XLIX for NBC Sports

From Editor Alan Chimenti: “It’s been a long haul since I started cutting that in NYC last July, throughout the Fall of 2014, and finally finishing it at my dining room table in San Francisco on Tuesday after receiving final player footage that was shot a few hours earlier in Phoenix. ”

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Esteemed client BODEGA’s Emmy Award-winning creative director Haley Geffen teamed up with NBC Sports Group and VP Creative Director/Director Tripp Dixon and RodeoFX to create the high-energy opening for Super Bowl XLIX.

Having collaborated on the Sunday Night Football open for three consecutive seasons, the Bodega team was well poised to intensify the energy and glitz for Super Bowl XLIX. Geffen and Dixon led a three-day shoot, months in advance of the big game, to capture Underwood’s performance that glamorized the Super Bowl. Bodega worked closely with RodeoFX to enhance the stage visuals for the stylized concert experience, with dynamic holographic letters emblazoning the Super Bowl logo on the stage. To craft the stage view looking out at the audience, a customized CG rendering of the University of Phoenix Stadium was created to transport viewers straight into the excitement of the game.

“It was great to work with two very talented and collaborative teams,” said Dixon. “We were able to rely on Bodega’s creative energy and prior production experience with the Sunday Night Football open, and combine that with RodeoFX’s strong visual effects capabilities, fresh perspective, and feature film experience.”

Parlaying its extensive visual effects experience in film, TV, and advertising, Rodeo FX crafted close to 80 shots, including the CG holographic roman numerals that display behind Underwood and 60,000 simulated fans. The project, led by advertising division creative director André Ü Montambeault, tapped Rodeo FX artists from every division, bringing on concept artists, modellers, senior effects artists and digital compositors from every department to bring the vision to life.

“This is a huge project, the biggest opening in sports,” said Geffen. “When we reviewed the pitches for this project, it was immediately clear to us that we wanted to go with Rodeo FX. We could see the caliber of what they offered and we knew they could make the opening better. André is a creative leader, understand what sells in sports, the NFL and in America. But more than that, he had the imagination to make it come alive.”

The intro consists of both live action shoot footage and archival footage from NFL games, that were shot by numerous networks,, using a wide range of frame rates and cameras. This all came into play for color grading. RodeoFX aimed to make it all look like it was shot together and intended to flow in a cinematic manner.

“Working with Tripp and Haley, who both have a strong background experience on such high-profile projects was a privilege,” said Montambeault. “The flamboyant and high-energy opening is the result of everyone’s collaborative effort, as well as the significant contribution of many of our talented and passionate artists.”

Adds Geffen, “It’s been such a great experience collaborating with NBC, working together to continue aiming to push the boundaries for sports opens.”

Credits:
Client: NBC Sports

Bodega
Creative Director: Haley Geffen
Head of Production: Michael Flexner
Line Producer: Rayna Saslove
Director of Photography: Chuck Ozeas
Production Designer: Evan Rohde

Northern Lights
Editor: Alan Chimenti
Executive Producer: Robin Hall
Assistant Editor: Tim Avery

Rodeo VFX
VFX Company: Rodeo FX, Montréal, Québec
President: Sébastien Moreau
Creative Director: André Ü Montambeault
Producer: Ashlee Wismach
Lead Compositor: Pierre Blain
Lead Motion Designer: Jocelyn Tremblay
CG Supervisor: Sébastien Francoeur

NBC Sports
Coordinating Producer: Fred Gaudelli
SVP Creative: Mark Levy
VP Creative Director/Director: Tripp Dixon
Senior Associate Director: Charlie Vanacore